The “Allmade” Shirts Brand Pays Workers Livable Wage in Haiti

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SPRINGFIELD, Mo. A local store in Springfield is trying to make a difference in the world with t-shirts.

KOLR10 spoke with the owners of Greek Corner, a local t-shirt company that’s now offering a socially and environmentally responsible brand.

Greek Corner just celebrated its new location Thursday, and told KOLR10 about the new brand “Allmade.”

The shirts are sewn in a factory in Haiti, where employees are paid a living wage.

“The average person makes less than 3-dollars a day in Haiti,” said Jason Parke, owner of Greek Corner.

Parke described the less-than-ideal work environments factory workers have in other countries.

“If you showed up at a factory in Bangladesh and said I’m here I want to come meet the people who make my clothes, there will be an armed guard at the gate to prevent you from going in,” said Joe Knittig, CEO of the Global Orphan Project.

“It was a life-changing trip,” Parke said, “when you actually go and see it with your own eyes, it gives you a new perspective of how good we have it here, it really makes you want to go make a difference in other people’s lives.”

Allmade employees are paid $15 a day and work in stable environments instead of a sweatshop.

“We have an open door policy,” Knittig said, “come meet your maker, you can meet them, talk to them, shake their hands, smile at them, we got nothing to hide.”

Allmade shirts are also made using material that benefits the environment.

The t-shirts are made out of 50% recycled water bottles, 25% organic cotton, and 25% modal.

“Modal is very similar to bamboo in the sense of the soft feel that it gives the shirt, so that’s why when you say recycled water bottles, it doesn’t sound like a very appealing feel to the shirt, that’s why we added that modal in,” said Ashley Metzger, product director of Allmade.

Metzger explained how they turn water bottles into fabric.

“We take a water bottle, we shred it into little pieces, we take those pieces, melt them into pellets, those pellets are spun into yarn, that yarn is then used to create this shirt that we have,” Metzger said.

The Global Orphan Project said its willing to take a little less profit to share it with the people who make it.

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