Five COVID-19 coronavirus “cures” debunked

News

SPRINGFIELD, Mo– The coronavirus, COVID-19, illness has already spread to Europe, the Middle East, and Latin America. Because of the disease spreading fast, people are looking for cures and remedies to help guard them against COVID-19.

Many of those “cures” are false, and Kendra Findley with the Springfield- Greene County Health Department explains why you need to know that there is no known cure or treatment for COVID-19.

“I would definitely warn people against buying a product that claims that it can cure coronavirus, especially this COVID-19 because there has been no science behind that, it’s too new to have any products that could cure that,” says Findley.

Below are some “cures” being shared on social media platforms like Facebook.

1. Silver Solution

Televangelist Jim Bakker was called out by the Center for Science in the Public Interest for using his show to tout supplements sold in his online store as able to cure the coronavirus “within 12 hours.”

According to a CBS News article, The clip shows Bakker asking Sellman: “This influenza, which is now circling the globe, you’re saying that Silver Solution would be effective?” To which Sellman replied: “Well, let’s say it hasn’t been tested against this strain of the coronavirus, but it’s been tested on other strains of the coronavirus and has been able to eliminate it within 12 hours.”

Findley says she has heard about this product.

“I have seen the claims of that product. First of all, there has been no testing associated with any product but specifically with that product. I would just warn individuals from purchasing anything and believing that that product could actually cure them of novel coronavirus,” says Findley.

She says that silver causes cancer.

2. Oregano Oil

According to an article written by Harvard Health Publishing, oregano oil has been a cure for circulating social media.

The article states that it is an unfounded claim.

Findley has not heard of oregano oil, but if one is looking to improve overall health, she says to turn to vitamins and minerals.

3. U.S. Government Vaccine

That same article shares that a hoax is going around about a vaccine the government patented for COVID-19 years ago.

5,000 Facebook users have shared that hoax.

4. Eating Boiled Garlic

According to FactCheck.org, a recipe on social media is saying to, “Eat and drink the boiled garlic water, overnight improvement, and healing.”

The recipe calls for eight cloves of chopped garlic and seven cups of water.

Looking at the tweet, you can tell it is false because of the numerous typos.

“I’ve never heard the claim of eating excessive garlic can protect you against microbes, so I’m not sure about that claim specifically,” she says.

Findley goes on to say that it could be helpful for social distancing.

5. Drinking Chlorine Dioxide

“Nobody should be swallowing any product like a chlorine dioxide,” says Findley.

The original claim about chlorine dioxide came from KerriRivera.com. The article states, “2.19 mg/L of chlorine dioxide in wastewater ensures complete inactivation of SARS-CoV (Coronavirus).”

FactCheck says Chlorine dioxide kits are sold online under various names but most often referred to as MMS, Miracle Mineral Solution.

“MMS hucksters sell the chemical solution as a cure-all for cancer, AIDS, autism and, now, the novel coronavirus,” says FactCheck.

One popular conspiracy theorist, Jordan Sather, posted a long thread about chlorine dioxide.

“I would not recommend that at all. That is not going to protect your body; it’s actually detrimental,” she says.

Now, if you want to use bleach to clean areas around your home or office, she highly recommends that.

With these “cures” being shared on social media, Findley says that if you see one you’re interested in, do the research yourself.

According to CBS News, Facebook is moving to quash advertisements claiming to offer cures or preventions for the deadly coronavirus disease.

Findley says it is sad that people are sharing these bad ideas, but there are always people who take advantage of others in situations like this.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Local Sports

More Local Sports

World News

More World News

Trending Stories

Washington DC Bureau

Washington DC Bureau

Newsfeed Now

More Newsfeed Now