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YouTube Contributers Can Use New Production Center

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- Looking to add a bit of spit and polish to its content, YouTube recently opened the doors to a high-tech video production center just a short drive from the center of the movie business in Hollywood.
LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- Seven years after it's launch, YouTube boasts a billion unique visitors every month.  Still, many of it's videos are shaky and shot with cell phones.  Looking to add a bit of spit and polish to its content, YouTube recently opened the doors to a high-tech video production center just a short drive from the center of the movie business in Hollywood.  And the services are free.

Inside this West Los Angeles building is a video production paradise built specifically for the more than one million people who regularly upload videos to YouTube.
"They don't have a big stage they can work on or they don't have a fast edit machine they can work on so that's available," says Liam Collins, head of YouTube Space LA.
 
This is YouTube Space LA, a 41,000 square foot facility with seven stages, a control room, twenty editing areas and more.

The space offers not just equipment, but expertise ranging from workshops to residencies and month-long labs focusing on categories such as comedy or beauty. The cost for all this?
"If you have a channel on YouTube that's really the price for admission," Collins says.
 
This crash course in video production is completely free.  Though, there is an application process and requirements include that partners have at least 10,000 subscribers and a hundred thousand views per month.  Creators must pay their way to Los Angeles, however.

Ann Le is one of 150 partners who have used the facility.
 
She and her husband and partner moved from the east coast to southern California hoping to grow their fashion channel.
"We're coming from a background where we do taxes and finances. It's not that fun. So here we get to be more creative and we're hoping to do this full time."

So far, 400 videos have been created here, including some by stars like actor Matt Damon and singer Robin Thicke.  None are close to reaching the billion-views of Gangnam style, but you never know when the next viral video will be born.

YouTube says while they offer technical advice, they refrain from creative critiques, leaving the content in the hands of the partners.


(Sumi Das, CNET.com for CBS News)

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