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Workers Overwhelmed by Flood Repairs in Waynesville 'Disaster Zone'

WAYNESVILLE, Mo. -- A month ago, the small Pulaski County town of Waynesville was fighting flood waters. Now the city is trying to clean up.
This looked like a disaster zone and it was. As of a few days ago, we'd hauled out 240 tons of debris.
WAYNESVILLE, Mo. -- A month ago, the small Pulaski County town of Waynesville was fighting flood waters. Now the city is trying to clean up.

Rows of homes are still empty because the flood waters caused so much damage. The houses along Mitchell Creek were hit especially hard, and the repairs are just beginning.

Matt Hayes, a general contractor in Waynesville, has been busy since the major flooding swept through his city.

"We're trying to get them done as fast as we can so people can get back into their houses have a place to sleep."

He's working on five houses in this neighborhood near Mitchell Creek.

"They're pretty much gutted right now," he says. "Repainting. Just a lot of everything. Tearing out the floors."

But for Hayes, this isn't just a job. Born and raised in Waynesville, he says this is the worst flooding he's ever seen there.

"It's horrible just to see everybody. My good friend Ed Wilson down there lost everything he owns. There's a lot of people who lost everything they've owned."

Pieces of lives, just washed away, ending up in Mitchell Creek. County officials think it will take about $250,000 to clean up the single creek bed.

"And several weeks of work," adds City Administrator Bruce Harrill. He says city employees and volunteers have already put in weeks of work to clean up the mess. "This looked like a disaster zone and it was. As of a few days ago, we'd hauled out 240 tons of debris."

But there is still a lot of work left to do.

"It'll probably take us several months to recover all the damage," says Harrill, with the help of cleanup crews and people like Matt Hayes, rushing to get his friends and neighbors back into their homes.

In Waynesville, they are waiting to see if they will be getting any help from FEMA.

Many towns are in the same boat as Waynesville, trying to get help to cover thousands of dollars in repair costs.
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