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What Will Be Impacted by Gov't Shutdown

WASHINGTON, DC -- If lawmakers fail to come to an agreement, a government shutdown could begin after midnight tonight. Here's a closer look at what and who could be impacted.
WASHINGTON, DC -- If lawmakers fail to come to an agreement, a government shutdown could begin after midnight tonight.  The effects could be far reaching -  from the nation's military to food inspection and airport personnel.  Here's a closer look at what and who could be impacted.  


Tourists were squeezing last minute visits to the Smithsonian Museums that line the National Mall Sunday, just in case they all close on Tuesday.

 "My husband's in meetings, and I was going to tour the city until Thursday, so very, very sad if they shut down Tuesday," says Karen Lewis of Peoria, Illinois.

"We were a bit disappointed because we had been planning this trip for a few months," adds Scott Maxwell of Murrells Inlet, South Carolina.


If there is a government shutdown National Parks will also close. Applications for government insured mortgages and small business loans would be put on hold.  Federal meat inspections, would continue but other routine food inspections could be suspended.  And numerous federal agencies - including the IRS and the EPA will operate with skeleton staffs.

"Everyone in this room knows these cuts are destroying jobs all across America, robbing children of the education they need, slowing the pace of lifesaving research, and threatening everything from public safety to public health," says  Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.) 


But most government functions would continue including mail delivery. Social Security checks would be processed, though there could be delays.  


Airport screeners, air traffic controllers, border guards, and FBI agents would stay on the job - but without pay until Congress reaches a deal.


The 1.4 million members of the uniformed military would remain on duty, though their pay could also be delayed.  About half of the Pentagon's 800,000 civilian workers would be furloughed.



Erika Townes is a nurse at a military base in Maryland. She was already furloughed earlier this year because of a previous congressional showdown.
 "So we already jumped off the carousel and now we've got to get back on again.  Really? we've already done our time.  Why are we having to pay this price, this debt once again?  It's not fair and it's not right."

What the shutdown will not stop is the next phase of the President's health care law. The health care exchanges for the uninsured to sign up for health coverage are set to open Tuesday as scheduled.


(Chip Reid, CBS News)
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