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Tree Trimmers Work Ahead of Expected Storm

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. -- People in northwest Arkansas will get Thursday's bad weather before southwest Missouri. Already one business in Fayetteville is getting more work than it can handle because people are worried about ice.
December is usually pretty rare for a storm to happen but it looks like we're getting ready to have one
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.  --  People in northwest Arkansas will get Thursday's bad weather before southwest Missouri.  Already one business in Fayetteville is getting more work than it can handle because people are worried about ice. 

The shopping season is underway, and aside from gifts, it might not be a bad idea to shop for tree care service.

"It's better to be proactive than to just wait last minute," says Cletus Wilkins, owner of Brown's Tree Care.

According to one tree care company, if branches are blanketing your home -- slice, before the ice.

"December is usually pretty rare for a storm to happen but it looks like we're getting ready to have one," Wilkins says.

Wilkins says ever since the forecast got frosty, his phones have been ringing off the hook.

It's coming at a time when business usually, like the temperatures, takes a dip.

"It's kind of slow for us between Thanksgiving and Christmas," Wilkins says.

"But call volume is up about 800 percent."

As Wilkins puts it, that can be good, and bad.

"Obviously if half of Northwest Arkansas calls and says they want it done right now, it's not gonna happen."

The amount of tree-trimming acrobats and chip-spitting machinery can only service so many people at any given time, especially just days out from a freeze.

"We try to stress all year," Wilkins says.

"Be preventative about it, there's no guarantee of when it's going to happen."

Wilkins says prices for a tree-trimming project can vary.

It normally begins with an estimate and a bid.

But the potential outcome, if one chooses to go without, is what really could be pricey in the end.

"We've seen trees that are right over power lines that can fall," Wilkins says.

"One time we had a five-ton tree fall on someone house and it was on the kids bedroom."

So for the next 24 to 36 hours, enjoy the mild sunsets and sturdy branches while they last.

"Oh there's a number of things that can happen."


(Tyler Thomason, KNWA)


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