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Tens of Thousands May be Dead in Philippines Typhoon

Typhoon Haiyan was possibly the strongest storm to ever make landfall when it washed over the Philippines Friday. Many areas are so devastated, officials say it will be hard to get aid to those who need it the most.
Typhoon Haiyan was possibly the strongest storm to ever make landfall when it washed over the Philippines Friday.  Many areas are so devastated, officials say it will be hard to get aid to those who need it the most. 

Typhoon Haiyan came ashore in Vietnam this morning as a category one storm, far weaker than the potential record-breaking typhoon that crashed into the Philippines Friday.

Tens of thousands are feared dead, but getting an accurate count is hard with communication systems down in many areas.

Jim Edds is a photographer from Florida who was in one of the hard hit areas. 

"It was just complete chaos.  A mass of people trying to get out of there because there's no food and no water," Edds says.

President Obama says his thoughts and prayers go out to the people affected by the storm.  He ordered the Pentagon to deploy marines to assist in recovery efforts.

The first wave of U.S. government aid already arrived.

"Food,water..its always the basic what they need," says Red Cross Relief Worker Luis Matnog.

Luis Matnog is based in Boston, headed to the Philippines. "It's my home country....and I've seen a lot of devastation in the Philippines, and it's emotional, but it's part of the job."

The devastation is so severe,  people are digging through the debris to find food as they wait for the much needed help

Many Filipino-Americans say they are watching the news and waiting for word from family members who haven't been heard from since before the storm hit.


(Susan McGinnis, CBS News)


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