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Teachers Playing Catch Up After Snowy First Semester

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- After a wild end to the first semester, Springfield Public School teachers are playing catch up on lesson plans. Monday marks the first day of the second semester for SPS, but they're suppose to be ten days into the new lesson plan.
It has been the longest semester of those 43 years.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- After a wild end to the first semester, Springfield Public School teachers are playing catch up on lesson plans.

KOLR 10’s Brett Martin spoke with one teacher who says getting her kids ready for the next year takes a lot of dedication and determination.

Monday marks the first day of the second semester for SPS, but they're suppose to be ten days into the new lesson plan.

Karen Darnell is a teacher at Central High School and has been in the classroom for more than 40 years but says this semester is one like any other.

"It has been the longest semester of those 43 years."

She says seven snow days in the first half of the school year is taking a toll on her students.

"Their sleep pattern is off and they're just like this and they are kind of whiny. I don't want to do this and I have to say come on, we have to get back into the groove," says Darnell. 

According to Karen, the first semester was suppose to end on December 19, 2013. The last day was Friday which is putting them ten days behind. She says working from home and planning ahead to catch up are a must to stay ahead now.

"As a teacher, you have to always be ready to adapt cause things come up."

KOLR 10’s Brett Martin caught up with her grading tests and she says test scores are low and she thinks the long break in between is to blame.

"We reviewed the last time they were here but it was last week. I told them when you walk in the door, what are we doing next, taking the final, and some had forgotten that."

Now, her fear is it could start to impact her students when it comes to end of the year testing.

All she can hope for is mother nature will not keep her kids out of school anymore this year.

"Just keep doing what we are doing now and be aware of what might be coming and adjust," says Darnell.

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