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Red Cross Sheltering Some Victims of Hollister Flooding

HOLLISTER, Mo. -- Nearly six inches of rain along Turkey Creek in Hollister, Missouri has driven dozens of residents from their homes.
HOLLISTER, Mo. -- Extreme flash flooding is wreaking havoc across the Ozarks again today.  

Nearly six inches of rain along Turkey Creek in Hollister, Missouri has driven dozens of residents from their homes.

KOLR10 meteorologist Lindsey Day, was live in Taney County to show us the mess.

Water rescue teams had to evacuate over 100 people this morning here in Hollister from the extreme flash flooding.  Folks in Old Mill Road subdivision, Hulland Park, and Hidden Valley mobile home park were hit hard before dawn this morning between 4 and 5:30 am. Four mobile homes were swept off their foundation, and cars were dragged by rushing waters.

Water got into homes and some downtown businesses, including the Symington Place strip center in downtown Hollister.

KOLR10's Nathan Vickers has been talking with volunteers at a Red Cross shelter in Hollister: 

Flood waters are receding, but more than 30 displaced Hollister residents will take shelter at the New Beginnings Fellowship Church on Elm Street.

The worst of the floods hit Hidden Valley Park, where Alethea Gillogoly found out about the flood online.

"I got on Twitter and it said Turkey Creek was on the rise. And I went outside to rushing water."
 
Some brought their pets to the shelter.  Bradley Smith helped his neighbor get a kitten to safety.  "My dad came to the back room and said, "We have to get out of here. It's flooding. I didn't believe him so I looked out the front porch and there's water."

Red Cross volunteers will provide food and water throughout the day with the help of a supply depot in Springfield.  "We'll be here as long as we're needed, the Red Cross will be," says Red Cross Captain  Richard Jones.

Residents are worried about a place to stay.  But though their clothes are dampened, their spirits are not.  "It's really upbeat to me. Everybody's there for you. Everybody wants to help you and get you to where you can get back into your home," Gillogly says.

"Some people like to see the bright side of things, not the dark side," Smith adds.

The Red Cross says the shelter can take on up to 75 people in the event of more flooding.

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