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Prostate Cancer: Deadly, But Curable

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Approximately one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime and African American men are at highest risk, though the reason remains unclear.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Approximately one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime and African American men are at highest risk, though the reason remains unclear.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer found in men in the United States.

While the exact cause of prostate cancer is unknown, risk factors include a high-fat diet and genetics.

Also, prostate cancer is highest among African American men.

“My older brother was diagnosed with prostate cancer and the cancer had moved into his body,” says prostate cancer survivor David Lewis. “After several years it killed him."

Symptoms of prostate cancer can be pain in the pelvic area, and include:

  • difficulty urinating
  • difficulty having an erection
  • bone pain (if the cancer has spread to the bones)

You can get screened for prostate cancer by having your doctor give you a digital rectal exam and a blood test.

The American Cancer Society recommends all men should discuss prostate screening with their doctor at the age of 50.

And African American men or men with a family history of prostate cancer should start the conversation at 45.

“When you face things like this, you probably value your day to day existence a little bit more than you did before,” says Lewis. “It puts it center face that life doesn't last forever."

Each year thousands of men die from prostate cancer, but it's a curable cancer.

And you can help protect yourself by maintaining a healthy weight, exercise, avoid smoking and eat a well-balanced diet.

David Lewis has a family history of prostate cancer.  All three of his brothers had prostate cancer as well.
 
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