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President Heads to Capitol Hill Today to Meet with Dems

WASHINGTON, DC -- Congress is preparing to head home for a month long break. But before they go, President Obama will head to Capitol Hill for a sort of pep rally with Democrats in the House and Senate.
WASHINGTON, DC -- Congress is preparing to head home for a month long break.  But before they go, President Obama will head to Capitol Hill for a sort of pep rally with Democrats in the House and Senate.

President Obama heads to Capitol Hill today to make sure Democrats are on the same page before battling it out with Republicans over the budget next month.
"As Washington heads towards another budget battle, the stakes couldn't be higher," he said.

When congressional members return after Labor Day, they face a big deadline:  Congress must approve a budget before October 1, or face a possible government shutdown

Senators Mike Lee, Ted Cruz, and Marco Rubio are among a group of Republicans who say they won't approve any new budget if it includes one thing:


"We all know that the government is going to get funded. The only question is whether the government gets funded with Obamacare or without it?" Lee told Fox News Sunday.

Lawmakers face another deadline: In about a month, the U.S. will hit it's debt ceiling and could default on it's loans unless Congress raises the borrowing limit.

If this sounds familiar, it should.  It's the same battle that played out in 2011.  The answer then?  Automatic budget cuts known as sequestration which Democrats blame for the slow economic recovery.

"We've already lost 1.6 million jobs.  Sequestration," says Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV).

But Republicans say the cuts aren't the problem.

"Borrowing, spending, raising taxes, and over-regulation are not a prescription for a vibrant economy," counters Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY), the Senate Minority Leader.

The 2011 debt ceiling debate led to America's credit being downgraded for the first time in history.

Immigration reform is another controversial topic on the Congressional agenda in September.  House Republicans say they will vote on their own plan.  It's uncertain whether or not they will include a path to citizenship for the estimated 11-million undocumented immigrants in the U.S.


(Susan McGinnis, CBS News)



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