62°F
Sponsored by

Potential Danger of Popular CrossFit Workout

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Many fans of an intense workout called CrossFit say they're in the best shape of their lives.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Many fans of an intense workout called CrossFit say they're in the best shape of their lives.

But this week, a physical therapy professor out of Colorado raised questions about the safety of the exercise.

Jared Stevens owns the gym CrossFit 417 in Ozark.

"CrossFit's hot right now so people are doing it," he said.

He creates a workout of the day that everyone does together.

"Someone might be doing a lot more weight than the next person, but they're doing the same workout," he said.

He said it creates a community atmosphere.

CrossFit critics purport that the competitive environment causes some to push their limits too far, to a muscle injury called Rhabdomyolysis or Rhabdo.

That's the subject of an article called CrossFit's Dirty Little Secret published this week by a physical therapist at Regis University in Denver.

"Basically its over stretching of the muscle cells which releases chemicals some of which are toxic and if you get enough of it into the blood stream it can cause kidney damage," said Dr. Jamie Jones of Cox Health Urgent Care.

Jones has seen four cases of Rhabdo in the last eight months.

"One out of four was from a CrossFit, three of the four were unrelated to CrossFit exercises," he said, "It's extremely rare. The fact that we've seen four cases in eight months is probably a little unusual number."

Jones said staying safe in CrossFit is the same as any other sport.

Hydrate, have a good coach, and know your limits.

Stevens has never had a case of Rhabdo at his gym, but as a CrossFit coach, he knows it's a risk for participants, like Brittany Mullen.

"There are times where I have to kind of back off and make myself slow down just to be safe," she said.

"It could definitely get dangerous," Stevens said.

But he keeps an eye on the gym, to make sure that none of his customers ever need to visit Dr. Jones.

To join the conversation, just find Laura Kennedy's post on the Ozarks First Facebook page.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus