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Ozarks Man Makes Custom Controllers for Gamers with Special Needs

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - Video games are one of the most popular forms of entertainment. An estimated 67 percent of U.S. households play them.

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - Video games are one of the most popular forms of entertainment. An estimated 67 percent of U.S. households play them.

But what about those with disabilities who want to play the games, but just can't?

An Ozarks man may have found the solution. Caleb Kraft is a self-proclaimed "tinkerer," and now his tinkering has put him into the position to possibly help anyone with a disability.

It's no secret Thomas Canter loves video games.

"More than anyone ever in the universe!" he says. But his ability to game could be more limited in the future. "It's my reflexes. I can't press a button really fast so I'm not able to speed run in certain games." 

Thomas has muscular dystrophy and to make sure Thomas' gaming doesn't take a pause, Kraft tinkered his way into the picture.

"I started the controller project to connect tinkerers like me with those in need."

The physical needs are obvious for those with MD, but Caleb's goal is to take control of the psychological needs.

"The leisure aspect is often ignored in terms of what's available to people," he says.

So Caleb created a totally customizable computer and video game controller.

"This is the brain that actually fools the computer into thinking all these little parts are the computer and mouse."

"I've never really heard of a controller you can do that," says Canter.

No matter the need, the controller can be customized to fit the person.

"He's able to use a controller so he can put them on here," adds Kraft. "He could place a button under his chin or use this lap board for a more comfortable position."

Caleb hopes a controller is a long term to solution, because if you ask Thomas, he'll be around video games for a very long time.

"I kinda want to work for SAGA," he says.

Kraft's website is the Controller Project. He has put how-to videos on the site, as well as instructions.

It's entirely free; Kraft says he's not in it to make a profit.

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