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Missouri Veto Session to Begin Tomorrow

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. –It’s a show down in the capitol city that will begin at high noon tomorrow. Missouri Republicans say they are trying to make history in the number of vetoes they override, but will they be successful when it comes to overriding the Governor’s veto on the hot-button issues?
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. –It’s a show down in the capitol city that will begin at high noon tomorrow. Missouri Republicans say they are trying to make history in the number of vetoes they override, but will they be successful when it comes to overriding the Governor’s veto on the hot-button issues?

The veto of Missouri House Bill 253 may have been the hottest issue of the summer.

Governor Jay Nixon launched a city-by-city campaign working ot win hearts and minds in an effort to let his veto stand.

Republicans, and now a group called Grow Missouri, had their own campaign and tour.

Now, the clock is ticking.

"How significant the potential cuts would be to necessary services,” says Nixon.

Nixon hit all parts of the state: St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, Hannibal and points in between. He won over school boards, cities like Springfield and even the Springfield Chamber of Commerce.

Nixon’s argument: The tax cuts in House Bill 253 would mean withholding hundreds of thousands of dollars from places like higher education.

Already hard-hit colleges and universities braced for more.

"The Governor in anticipation that the veto might be overridden anticipates a 400 million dollar gap in the budget for the next year," says Dr. Hal Higdon, president of Ozark Technical Community College.

But, Republicans and Grow Missouri launched a campaign of their own in communities across the Show-Me-State.

"I'm a big believer that the more money that government has, the bigger the government is," says Loren Wren, an attendee of a Grow Missouri meeting.

In a surprising move, Texas Governor Rick Perry joined the campaign, inviting Missouri business to move to Texas where they have no state income tax joined them.

"Why have more jobs and businesses moved to Texas than any other state?" says Perry in a commercial.

Nixon fired back.

Now, both sides are nearing the moment they have to lay their cards on the table.

To override the veto, 109 votes are needed. That’s exactly the number of the House Republicans.

In late July, House Speaker Tim Jones told one media agency he no longer believed they had the votes to override the bill.

Those who wish to contact local lawmakers, use the links on this page and the district map as a resource.



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