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Local School Earns High Scores on MAP Tests

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – The Missouri Map Test numbers are now public, showing how the state holds districts accountable for how their students are learning.
“I’ve lived on both sides of the fence,” says Ashton. “It feels much better when you’re successful.”
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – The Missouri Map Test numbers are now public, showing how the state holds districts accountable for how their students are learning.


For districts like St. Louis and Kansas City, the results mean trouble for the already struggling schools.


Springfield, however, scored 124.5 out of the possible 140 points. 


Reed Middle School is one of the schools that has faced many obstacles, but increased its scores from previous years.


The school says despite being housed in a nearly 100-year-old building and the issues their students face, they tackle their academic challenges head on.


“We put a great deal of emphasis on kids ability to be confident in their writing,” says Kevin Ashton, an English teacher at Reed Middle School. 


Ashton has been at Reed Middle School since the late 80s.


“We look at Greek and Latin roots so they’re able to read technical information,” says Ashton.


Ashton knows, Reed, like other schools, has many obstacles such as a high percentage of students on free and reduced lunch and attendance problems.


Making strides on the standardized MAP test means these teachers and students have worked hard.


“We got 100 percent of our points available in both communication arts and math, which is huge for us because we’ve never (done that before),” says Dr. Debbie Grega, the principal at Reed Middle School.  “I don’t think we’ve ever done that, got 100 percent of the points.”


For teachers, the points are edifying.


“I’ve lived on both sides of the fence,” says Ashton. “It feels much better when you’re successful.”


Ashton says the tests offer accountability.


“With accountability always comes advancements so I think the standardized testing has been a positive,” says Ashton.  “It gives kids immediate feedback as to where they are at and gives us goals and forces us to have strategies to make improvements.”


Principal Grega says on this day students are taking performance series tests that let the school gauge how children are doing at the beginning, middle and end of the school year offers the teachers a chance to help them along the way.


“We we’re doing a better job of not just thinking we know what the students need,” says Grega. “We’re actually basing it on data.”


While the MAP testing itself may be stressful, Ashton says the work is important for school, teachers and students alike.


“You want to make sure you’re held accountable for raising those scores,” says Ashton. “Because socially for America, it’s important.”

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