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How Much Has Changed Since School Segregation in Springfield?

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Homer Boyd grew up in a time period where it was supposed to be separate, but equal. He says separate it was, but equal it was not.
You want to judge his children by the content of his character, not by the color of their skin, and in some places, it's still being done that way.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Homer Boyd is an 80-year-old African-American man who was born and raised in Springfield. He's dealt with racism his whole life.

Boyd grew up in a time period where it was supposed to be separate, but equal. He says separate it was, but equal it was not.

"I dealt with it in school, and I dealt with it when I went to the army, I dealt with it all through life....and in some cases, you deal with it now."

Boyd says the laws might have changed, but racism still exists. He went to school where OTC is now.

"Lincoln Hall, that was Lincoln High School. That was where I went to school and grade school."

He says it was different than the "white" schools.

"It was supposed to be separate but equal, but it wasn't. It was segregated, and you knew it was segregated. They didn't let you forget."

He grew up across the street from Smith Park.

"When I was young, I wasn't allowed to go to that park. I had to go to Silver Springs Park."

After high school, Boyd joined the Army. He came back to Springfield, got married, and moved to Minnesota for a few years. Despite his struggles growing up, he decided to move back.

"This is my home," he says. "This is where we were raised."

He says there have been many positive changes since the March on Washington.

"We have a black president. I never thought I'd ever see that."

But he feels there is still a lot of work to be done since Dr. King's famous speech.

"You want to judge his children by the content of his character, not by the color of their skin, and in some places, it's still being done that way."

Boyd was in show business for many years and was very active in the community despite his hardships.
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