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House May Vote Today to Restore Military Death Benefits

WASHINGTON, DC -- On Day 9 of the federal government shutdown, the blame game continues and there is still no deal in sight. But as Congress continues to fight, families of fallen service members are feeling the impact.
WASHINGTON, DC -- On Day 9 of the federal government shutdown, the blame game continues and there is still no deal in sight.  But as Congress continues to fight, families of fallen service members are feeling the impact. 

The bodies of four American service members killed in the line of duty this weekend arrive at Dover Air Force Base today. One of them is SA Sgt. Joseph Peters of Springfield.

The government would typically pay for the families to fly to Delaware to witness the return of their loved ones. But that money is now on hold... a casualty of the government shutdown.

"I'm embarrassed, all of us should be," says Sen. John McCain (R-AZ)

The families of 17 service members have already been denied benefits - including a $100,000 payment due within 36 hours of death.
"The death gratuity is extended to help cover funeral costs and help with immediate living expenses until survivor benefits kick in," says Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV).

The House is expected to vote today to restore those benefits.  But an agreement to end the shutdown is still nowhere in sight.

"It's pretty much the same thing every day and we're not really getting anywhere between each side," notes Steve Chaggaris, executive editor of CBSNews.com.

President Obama Tuesday warned Republicans he would not negotiate until Congress re-opens the government and raises the debt ceiling. 
"We can't make extortion routine as part of our democracy.  Democracy doesn't function this way."

Republicans say first, the Democrats must agree to spending cuts.
"We can't raise the debt ceiling without doing something about what's driving us to borrow more money and to live beyond our means," says House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH).

The Treasury Department says it will run out of money to pays its bills on October 17th. The International Monetary Fund issued a warning Tuesday that a U.S. default on its loans would push the country back into a recession and hurt the global economy.


(Susan McGinnis, CBS News)



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