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High Chair Injuries on the Rise

If you have a baby or toddler in the family, you know how important high chairs are. But did you also know they can be dangerous? A new study finds that high chair injuries are on the rise.
If you have a baby or toddler in the family, you know how important high chairs are.  But did you also know they can be dangerous?   
A new study finds that high chair injuries are on the rise. What's going wrong?

High chairs and booster seats make mealtimes easier  for little ones. 

But a new study out of nationwide children's hospital in Columbus, Ohio has found high chair injuries have increased by 22% in the U.S. over the past decade.

"Not only did the numbers increase by more than 20% but if you looked at injuries to the head, those increased by almost ninety percent," says Gary Smith of Nationwide Children's Hospital.

The study, published in the journal Clinical Pediatrics, looked at  data between 2003-2010 and found that there was an average of more than 94-hundred high chair-related injuries seen in the emergency rooms each year.

"We had cuts, pinches, lacerations, bruises and other things that were from other mechanisms, " Smith notes.

Most of the children were injured after they fell out of the high chair.

Researchers say, that's because parents don't use the straps that come with the chairs,     Smith says.  "When the information was available, information about the child standing, twisting, or pulling themselves out of the straps and that's how they fell."

Best advice to parents?

"The top three things that I would recommend to a parent to prevent injuries from falls from a high chair is strap your child in, stray your child in,  strap your child in."


(Carl Azuz for CNN's Health Minute)

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