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FDA Trans Fat Rule Makes an Impact on Businesses

(CNN) -- The FDA’s push to ban trans fats could forever change some of your favorite foods and we're not just talking about what you buy at the super market.
(CNN) -- The FDA’s push to ban trans fats could forever change some of your favorite foods and we're not just talking about what you buy at the super market.

It will also have a huge impact on your local bakery and maybe, your favorite croissants.

New federal regulations could soon force Thomas Gencarelli to change the way he's always made the donuts at Brother’s Quality Bakery in Kearny, New Jersey.

"We haven't changed recipes in 40 years. Everything is all old school, old fashioned.” He shows us where he makes the donuts, “this is where we fry the donuts inside this oil."

That oil is all purpose vegetable shortening, it contains artificial trans fat which the food and drug administration is now taking steps to ban. The American Medical Association calls this change a life-saving move that can help keep the public healthy.

Anthony Calandra says there are no trans fats in most of his baked goods. Due to the health benefits, he supports a trans fat ban even if it means changing some of the recipes in his bakery…even if it means getting rid of a top selling Italian pastry.

"It should have happened already."

"Without it you're not going to get this type of flakiness in the dough."

Trans fat is found in processed foods made with partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, it's been linked to heart disease and for years now it's been under attack. In 2007 New York City banned restaurants from using artificial trans fats. In recent years, more and more fast-food chains and food manufacturers voluntarily made the switch to healthier oils.

"I don't think it's really a taste issue. It was cheaper for the food companies to do this over the years. But now, most of the science says we ought to get it out of the food supply."

Not everyone agrees, In new jersey, Gencarelli says every year he uses fifteen thousands pounds of shortening - with trans fat- in order to get time-tested recipes just right.

"It's going to change the taste of the donut. It's going to change the quality of the donut. And it is going to taste the texture of the donut."

Gencarelli believes there's no need for new regulations, it's always been up to consumers to practice moderation.

"I believe it's not going to kill you. As long as you don't eat a pan of donuts. You know?"

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