67°F
Sponsored by

Documentary on Beer Historian Comes to Missouri

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- One Ohio man really loves beer. In fact he loves it so much, he's traveling the country visiting breweries and writing books. His journey is the subject of a documentary film, part of which is being shot this week in Missouri.
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- One Ohio man really loves beer. In fact he loves it so much, he's traveling the country visiting breweries and writing books.  His journey is the subject of a documentary film, part of which is being shot this week in Missouri.

But what makes his story so interesting is that he is doing it all while having autism.

Tuesday, the man visited the Boulevard Brewery in Kansas City.

"I learned about the bootleggers and rumrunners a long time ago," said 55-year-old Lance Rice.

For Rice, there's just something really special about a brewery.

"It's really impressive, I really like it," he said while touring Boulevard.

While most people see metal and machines, he sees something else.

"It's a good title," Rice exclaimed when asked how he feels about being called the Rain Man of beers.

His is a passion for beer, like few others, that began long before he could ever drink one. Rice started collecting beer cans when he was a kid. He has autism and said the cans would relax and calm him. He now owns thousands of them and has decided to write a book about the history of beer.

It's a story that's caught the interest of a national documentary crew.

"Lance's story is about the beauty of autism and about overcoming incredible odds, and it's about a dream coming true. At 55 years old, it's about the impossible becoming possible," said Aaron Rice, the director of the documentary.

But Rice does more than just consume and collect beer things - he's also a historian. He knows nearly everything there is to know about beer. It's knowledge that's going into his upcoming book.

"There was the MK Getz Brewing Company of St. Joseph, MO, long gone out of business too," he said.

Rice said just because someone has autism doesn't mean they can't be passionate about something like beer. He admits for him it's more of an obsession, but he's hoping others will learn from his story and realize anyone can do whatever they set their mind, or lips, to.

"It's going to give people hope, families hope that have children with autism, to inspire their children with autism," he said.

In all, Rice will travel to more than 70 breweries across the Midwest. His book is due out in the spring of 2014.


(KCTV for CNN)

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus