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Do Omega-3 Fatty Acids Really Boost the Brain?

Omega three fatty acids have been advertised as one of the best daily supplements you can take. Many nutritionists claim omega threes can help the heart, cut down on strokes and even boost the brain. But do they really? New studies say hold on.
Omega three fatty acids have been advertised as one of the best daily supplements you can take. Many nutritionists claim omega threes can help the heart, cut down on strokes and even boost the brain. But do they really? New studies say hold on.

Fatty fish, like tuna and salmon, are chock full of them: So are nuts.

Omega three fatty acids have been touted by many health experts as magic supplements that can help the body stay healthy, especially when it comes to the brain.

But according to a new study in the Journal of Neurology, omega threes don't seem to protect against conditions such as dementia, as originally thought.

Researchers looked at more than 2,000 elderly women and noted the medications and supplements they were taking.

Investigators also examined data on the participant's memory, visual and motor skills over a six year period. They found women who were taking the omega fatty acids, had no more real protection when it came to these cognitive skills.

This is not the first study that found omega threes to be less than miraculous.

A study last summer showed a possible connection to omega three fatty acids and an increased risk for developing prostate cancer. So researchers say it's best to talk to your doctor about the supplements you take.
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