31°F
Sponsored by

DEA: "Meth-Resistant" Drug not Meth Resistant

ST. LOUIS, Mo. – The Missouri Narcotics Officers Association originally believed that “Zephrex-D” was made to be “meth-lab resistant” when using it in the most common method of processing meth.
ST. LOUIS, Mo. – The Missouri Narcotics Officers Association originally believed that “Zephrex-D” was made to be “meth-lab resistant” when using it in the most common method of methamphetamine processing.

The process, called “one pot shake and bake”, is used in 87 percent of all meth labs.

Now, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is in disagreement with the makers of Zephrex-D, Westport Pharmaceuticals.  Government chemists were able to manufacture meth from the drug and now the DEA wants to make sure the product is kept behind the counter.

Zephrex-D is a drug that contains pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient used to make methamphetamine.

“It is something stored behind the counter," says Family Pharmacy Pharmacist Matt McNitt.  "So patients have to show their IDs in order to obtain anything that has pseudoephed or pseudoephedrine."

While McNitt says pseudoephedrine abuse is not a problem at his pharmacy, others aren’t so lucky.

“It is a problem that occurs in many pharmacies," McNitt says.  "As far as people trying to come in and obtain pseudoephedrine for the production of meth."

The maker of congestion-relief medicine Zephrex-D was convinced the product was the first and only product containing pseudoephedrine that couldn’t be used to make meth with.

The DEA, however, is refusing to allow the medicine to be sold over the counter, saying government chemists were actually able to manufacture meth from the product.

"What these new companies are doing is creating their own patented technology to create an abuse deterrent," McNitt says.  "So the company tried to make it to a point to where it can't be used in the production of meth, based on current production techniques."

"This is not going to stop them from making meth," Christian County Sheriff Joey Kyle told us in a December 2012 interview.

The DEA sent us this statement:

"DEA commends the efforts of companies to develop products that deter the production of illicit drugs.  While this particular company claims that their "drug delivery system provides a new and unconventional approach to combat drug misuse," this product can still be utilized to manufacture methamphetamine.  As such, controls on this product cannot be relaxed as this product does not meet the exemption criteria under the Controlled Substances Act."

McNitt says when patients purchase any product with pseudoephedrine, they have to sign for it. That information then goes into a state database that logs the transactions.



Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus