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Was Frazier Glenn Cross Once In Witness Protection?

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- The man charged with murder in a shooting rampage at a Jewish center near Kansas City may have been under witness protection at one point, according to documents and his own autobiography.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- The man charged with murder in a shooting rampage at a Jewish center near Kansas City that took three lives, may have been under witness protection at one point, according to documents and his own autobiography.

Federal officials do not confirm who has participated in the program, but the claim could give some insight into confusion about the Aurora man's name, since he is known by both Glenn Cross and Glenn Miller.

In a final chapter added in 2010 to his 1999 autobiography "A White Man Speaks Out," the white supremacist claims he and his family spent time in federal protection.

"I originally agreed to going into the witness program so that my wife and 4 small children (oldest 11 when i was arrested) Would be taken care of while I served my prison sentence," Cross wrote in his book.

Federal court sentencing documents from 1987 note a plea bargain that shows then-Frazier Glenn Miller was participating with the Department of Justice, continuing to do so was a condition of his sentence.

Cross confirmed his participation with authorities in his book.
 
The book also chronicles his involvement with the Ku Kux Klan, including a 1979 shootout in North Carolina. The documents detail several conditions of his sentence, including "That he not be a member of, or associate with any white supremacist organizations," or possess over a five-year period after serving three years in prison.

In his book, however, Cross says at no point did he give up any of hate group associations. Cross wrote that he did not spend much time in witness protection, claiming the "feds quickly dumped" him.

Bond is set at $10 million for Sunday's shootings at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City, and Village Shalom, an assisted living center.

Three people died, 14-year-old Reat Underwood and his 69-year-old grandfather, William Lewis Corporon, along with Terri LaManno, 53, who was visiting her mother at the assisted living center. 

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