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Federal Transportation Funding Dwindling

WASHINGTON, D.C.-- Lawmakers cannot agree on how to fund future road projects.
WASHINGTON, D.C.-- Early next month voters in Missouri will head to the polls to vote on a three-quarter of a penny tax increase on gas. These funds will go toward new transportation projects.

The state and federal coffers are dwindling and a big part of the problem lies in Congress.
It’s a familiar sight across the country roads under construction, you may see less improvement to your highways and byways if congress doesn’t act to replenish the highway transportation fund by august first.

“Well, we have about 30 days before the transportation trust fund goes broke,” says John Smith, Transportation for America.

Proposals are now under review in both the house and senate committees, but there are some concerns that differences could get in the way before members hit the road for the august recess.

“And we want to make sure those roads are safe for our children but also for our economy,” says Vicky Hartzler, US Congress.

A delay in funding could cause major havoc in multi-million dollar bridge and road repair. That’s a big problem for Missouri which receives nearly 40 percent of its transportation funding from the federal government.

When discussing options for new funding, it’s unclear where the money will come from. That said, it’s quite clear what at least one US congressman will not support.

“Toll roads are the worst way to fund it. And so that’s what I’m always afraid of, they are going to go the toll road route, and so we have to come up with a better funding formula than that,” says Congressman Billy Long.


With millions of miles of highway on the line, the clock is ticking.
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