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V-2-V: The Future of Cars?

WASHINGTON, DC -- The government wants to make driving safer by making our cars smarter and able to "talk" to each other. It's emerging technology the Obama administration is getting behind.
WASHINGTON, DC -- The government wants to make driving safer by making our cars smarter and able to "talk" to each other.  It's emerging technology the Obama administration is getting behind.

Cars that talk to each other may sound like science fiction - but they could be on the road in the not too distant future.
The Department of Transportation wants cars outfitted with vehicle to vehicle or V-2-V technology in the next ten years.

"V2V has the potential to help drivers avoid 70 to 80 percent of vehicle crashes involving unimpaired drivers," explains Anthony Foxx, Transportation Secretary.

Many cars already have sensors that can detect other vehicles up close.
V-2-V goes a step further.  Radio waves allow cars to communicate with one another and avoid potential accidents.

Ford is already testing the technology.
Here the driver is warned about (an impending collision with) A car he can't see.

The Obama administration is working on rules to eventually require auto makers to equip their cars with V-2-V.

"I think within about the next decade consumers will start to see this technology aboard their new vehicles," believes David Friedman with the National Highway Safety Administration.

And V-2-V may be just the beginning - several car companies are testing autonomous cars that drive themselves - a technology with the potential to prevent almost all crashes.

There are privacy concerns with this new technology - but the Obama Administration says the V2V cannot be used to track a driver's whereabouts.


(Tara Mergener for CBS News)

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