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Today's Top Medical Stories for Tuesday, April 22, 2014

New findings in the debate over mammograms. And new evidence of a link between dietary fats and the growth of colon cancer.
A new study looks at the consequences when mammograms turn up false positives for breast cancer. The survey published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, found that after a false positive 50-percent of women reported their anxiety as moderate or higher. About five percent described their anxiety as extreme.  One in four said they were more likely to undergo future breast cancer screenings. 

Scientists have new evidence of a link between dietary fats and the growth of colon cancer. A study at Arizona State University identified a specific molecule active in processing fat and found it plays a role in the growth of colon cancer tumors. They hope the findings will help in the development of new therapies for fighting colorectal cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S.

And researchers have found that children suffering from irritable bowel syndrome are at higher risk for celiac disease. Celiac is an immune reaction to eating gluten, which is found in common grains. It causes stomach pain and inflammation of the intestine. The study in JAMA Pediatrics found that diagnoses of celiac were four times higher among children with irritable bowel syndrome.

(Don Champion for CBS News)


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