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Today's Top Medical Stories for August 27, 2014

Losing weight may help prevent Alzheimer's. And a new approach to treating adolescent depression.

Up to one in five teenagers suffer through major depression. Researchers say the best treatment may be a collaboration between the patient, the parents and a care manager. The group meets with a primary care doctor, rather than a psychiatrist, to discuss symptoms and treatments. A study in the journal of the American Medical Association finds that after a year, those teenagers had a 50-percent improvement in their symptoms.

Obesity can lead to abnormal changes in the brain, raising the risk of Alzheimers disease by 35-percent. A new study in Brazil finds that weight loss surgery can reverse that risk. Researchers studied the brains of obese patients and found that after bariatric surgery activity in the areas linked to Alzheimers disease goes back to normal.

Patients who manage their own blood pressure may do better at reducing their risk of cardiovascular disease. A program at the University of Oxford allowed patients to monitor their hypertension and to adjust their medication accordingly. After a year, that group saw a bigger decrease in blood pressure than the group that relied on health care workers.


(Brian Webb for CBS News)


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