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Today's Top Medical Stories for Wednesday, July 9, 2014

New research finds a combined effort may be the best way to stop smoking and a new study finds big differences in surgical care across the country.
Many U.S. hospitals still perform traditional surgery for many common procedures, even though minimally invasive surgery is associated with better outcomes and fewer complications. Researchers at Johns Hopkins found some hospitals never used minimally invasive surgery and some used it 75 percent of the time for procedures such as appendectomies and hysterectomies. Researchers say urban hospitals were more likely to use minimally invasive surgery.

A new study finds no increased risk of getting a blood clot after getting vaccinated for HPV. There had been some research suggesting a link. But researchers in Denmark looked at more than half a million women who received the vaccine. They found no increased risk of blood clot in the 42 days after vaccination - which is the main risk period.

And a new study finds the smoking cessation drug Varenicline - known by its brand name Chantix - is more effective when combined with nicotine replacement therapy. Researchers in South Africa divided nearly 500 smokers into two groups. They found nearly half the people who received the combination were smoke-free six months later, compared to 33  percent who received just the drug.


(Wendy Gillette for CBS News)


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