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Thanksgivukkah: Thanksgiving and Hanukkah Collide

CBSNews -- For Jewish families, two holidays collide this week. They get to celebrate thanksgiving and Hanukkah... Simultaneously!
CBSNews -- For Jewish families, two holidays collide this week. They get to celebrate thanksgiving and Hanukkah... Simultaneously!

KPIX 5's Ann Notarangelo reports on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity now fondly known as "Thanksgivukkah."

This is what happens when Thanksgiving is late and Hanukkah is early.  Sweet potato latkes.
 
Like many Jews around the country, Florence Weiss has embraced this historical phenomenon. 

It's only the second time in history the first day of Hanukkah and Thanksgiving collide. 

Social media has taken the convergence of holidays to a whole new level.
 
“All of a sudden it went from ‘how about this coincidence, it hasn't happened in so many years and is never going to happen in our lifetime’-- to it's becoming a big commercial thing,” says Weiss.
 
Hanukkah is more than 2000 years old, but Thanksgiving's been around only 150 years. 

The next time the holidays collide? 

70,000 years from now. So enjoy this one. 

It's brought the Jewish faith into the spotlight with t-shirts and new recipes.
 
As is the case in a number of Jewish holidays, there's a lot of tie in to food.

Along with the latkes will be the traditional Thanksgiving turkey, but with a twist.  Like brining the turkey in manischewitz wine.
 
“Normally I might do a corn bread stuffing,” says Weiss. “And this year I'm making a challah chestnut apple stuffing." 
 
Culinary creativity has gone nuts on the internet, but both holidays have something to savor and they don't seem to be overshadowing each other.

“On the other hand, my son wanted the traditional sweet mashed potatoes with marshmallows that he's had since childhood,” says Weiss. “So we'll be making both.”
 
Both holidays focus on gratitude.  Hanukah is about one vial of oil miraculously lasting eight days, and Thanksgiving is for counting blessings.
 
This is why you’ll see a pilgrim and turkey menorah in Weiss’ home and hear prayers of thanks. 

While the holidays will never again align this way for us, it just may start some new traditions.

Happy Thanksgivukkah.
 
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