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Still No Sign of Missing Malaysian Plane

PERTH, AUSTRALIA -- Military aircraft from several countries are being used to today to search for debris that could belong to the missing Malaysia Airlines jet.
PERTH, AUSTRALIA --  Military aircraft from several countries are being used to today to search for debris that could belong to the missing Malaysia Airlines jet.

One plane already completed its mission for the day - without finding any sign of the triple-7 that vanished March 8th.

Australia's P-3 Orion aircraft traveled four hours this morning...to a remote part of the southern Indian Ocean.
Crews are searching the area for two pieces of debris spotted on satellite images Sunday that may be connected to missing flight 370.

"We've been throwing everything we've got at that area to try to learn more about what this debris might be," said Tony Abbott, Australia's Prime Minister.

The search zone is southwest of Perth, Australia in an area called the roaring 40's...40 degrees south of the equator...known for strong westerly winds.
Because of the distance to and from the location all military planes involved can only search for two hours per trip due to fuel limitations.

"It's about the most inaccessible spot that you could imagine on the face of the earth, but if there is anything down there we will find it. We owe it to the families of those people to do no less," Abbott said.

On Thursday, relatives of some of the 239 missing people on board arrived at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur's airport searching for answers:

"We tried to address, not to say problems, to answer their questions as far as we can," stressed  Ong Ka Ting, Malaysian Special Envoy To China.

Buoys are now in the ocean to chart the currents...but officials caution it could take weeks to find the debris.

Several ships will also take part in the search.  A Norwegian vessel is already in the area and China's government says it is sending three naval ships to join the search.


(Tara Mergener for CBS News)

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