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Missouri Adoption Case Apparently Over - Supreme Court Passes

CARTHAGE, Mo. -- The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear a Carthage, Missouri adoption case. This appears to be the end of a long case that began when an undocumented woman from Guatamala petitioned to regain her parental rights.
CARTHAGE, Mo. -- The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear a Carthage, Missouri adoption case.
This appears to be the end of a long case that began when an undocumented woman from Guatamala petitioned to regain her parental rights.

"I don't you know .. just it's a roller-coaster its been a roller-coaster."
The custody battle for Melinda Moser and her family is believed to be over according to attorneys in the case.

Moser is the adoptive mother of 7-year old Jamison Moser and for nearly seven years she's fought to keep custody.

All the while, Jamison's biological mother tried to use the courts to regain custody of her son.

A relieved Moser recalls the experiences.
"Kind of like people probably that suffer with a terminal illness, you never know which day will be your last. "

Jamison's biological mother,  Encarnacion Romero, had been arrested during an immigration raid and was later convicted of identity theft. 

After leaving federal prison in 2009, Romero filed to overturn the adoption case and won.

The Mosers appealed to the Missouri Supreme Court, that reversed the lower court's decision.

"There would be days the doubt fear and the worry would be overwhelming."

Romero then filed a petition to the U.S. Supreme Court.

"This is the new case that now every other case in the state of Missouri looks to and quotes when an adoption case comes up," says Joe Hensley, the Moser's attorney.

Hensley, of Joplin says the ripple effect of the case has forever changed the adoption process in Missouri.

"There's been new guidelines set down for juvenile offices and how they are supposed to participate in private adoption, new standards for guarding items that came out as a result in this case"
 
"I would encourage people to not be afraid because those child regardless if they're in your home for a day or a lifetime .. they need that love and that support," Moser says.

Moser also says she still worried about Jamison's security, but the Carthage Police Department continues to work with the family. Jamison is seven years old and has dual citizenship.
Reporters reached out to attorneys representing Jamison's from biological mother, but did not hear back.


(Ruday Harper, KOAM for CBS Newspath)


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