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Not All Fats Are Bad for Your Diet

Fat gets such a bad rap - and with good reason - but not all fats are lousy. There are actually good fats and bad fats. And we need the good type every day.
With warmer weather upon us many of us are thinking about eating light and avoiding fattening foods. But not all fats are created equal, there are good fats and bad fats. 

Fat gets such a bad rap - and with good reason - but not all fats are lousy.  There are actually good fats and bad fats.  And we need the good type every day. 

"Good fats actually help to keep your heart healthy, they keep your blood vessels healthy as well," says Marisa Moore, a registered dietitian.
"They help to keep the skin smooth, they provide energy."

You find them in nuts and seeds, avocados, and vegetable oils such as olive oil, canola and peanut oil.

"You can also get them from fatty fish like sardines, salmon, mackerel, lake trout," Moore notes.  
Eat them in moderation - about 20 to 30 percent of your daily calories.  

And the bad or saturated fats?  We know them all too well.  They lurk in foods we love:  Fried foods, baked goods, cookies and crackers, fatty meat, and high fat dairy.  Eat less than 10% of your daily calories from these foods.

And stay clear of anything with "partially hydrogenated" fats on the label.

"When you eat more of the common bad fats it actually causes your liver to produce more bad cholesterol and over time you end up damaging your blood vessels," warns Moore. 

So as you shop, reach for the good fats and let the bad guys stay on the shelf. 


(Holly Firfer for CNN's Health Minute) 

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