85°F
Sponsored by

Nixon Snuffs Out E-Cig, Armed Teachers Bills; Signs 'Right to Try'

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Gov. Jay Nixon signed several bills into law, vetoed two others and let two more become law without his own action on Monday, the deadline for any decisions on outstanding legislation passed by lawmakers.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Gov. Jay Nixon signed several bills into law, vetoed two others and let two more become law without his own action on Monday, the deadline for any decisions on outstanding legislation passed by lawmakers.

"A thinly disguised and cynical attempt to exempt e-cigarettes from taxes and regulations," that's what Gov. Jay Nixon said about a bill that would absolve e-cigarettes from the same laws that affect traditional tobacco.

He vetoed that bill, , calling it a threat to public health.

The governor also vetoed a bill that would have allowed designated teachers to carry concealed firearms in classrooms.

"Springfield Public Schools is a weapons-free school district so we agree with Gov. Nixon's stance against arming teachers and school administrators. The role of protecting our students and staff is best performed by our highly trained school police officers," Springfield Public Schools Superintendent Dr. John Jungmann said.

Another bill affecting the classroom will allow teachers and parents to make recommendations about rigor in conjunction with Common Core through a special review that could lead to a revision of the adopted standards. The governor signed that bill into law.

Nixon also signed a bill allowing the use of hemp extract to treat epilepsy. It also allows licenses for industrial hemp growing research.

Another bill is aimed at giving terminally ill patients the right to try investigational drugs before final approval by the FDA.

A local family, the Heils, gave testimony before lawmakers in Jefferson City earlier in the year about taking swift action on the bill.

"At nine months old she was diagnosed with a brain tumor," Springfield mother Melissa Heil said during the testimony. "This needs to happen quickly because terminally ill patients don't have time."

One of the bills that the governor let become law without his signature redefines "misconduct" and "good cause" for unemployment benefits purposes. The other authorizes gaming establishments to provide lines of credit.

Lawmakers can decide to attempt an override of any of the governor's vetoes through in September.


Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus