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Nearly $1 Million Given to Community Through Joplin Tornado Fund

JOPLIN, Mo. – During a press conference Tuesday, Phil Stinnett, Chairman of the Tornado First Response Board, announced the distribution of nearly $1 million to numerous community groups who work to provide safety, security and recovery of Joplin and Duquesne residents after the 2011 tornado.
JOPLIN, Mo. – During a press conference Tuesday, Phil Stinnett, Chairman of the Tornado First Response Board, announced the distribution of nearly $1 million to numerous community groups who work to provide safety, security and recovery of Joplin and Duquesne residents after the 2011 tornado.

Just three days after the May 22, 2011 disaster, the Joplin Tornado First Response Fund was established for donors seeking a way to help the community after the EF-5 tornado.

“First, let me say thank you,” says Stinnett. “Nearly $1 million came into our community from hundreds of people. The compassion and support of so many people are reflected in the grants that were given with their donations. 27 agencies were able to use these funds to provide assistance to thousands who were affected by the disaster.”

Stinnett provided a full report of the allocations of the funds, which totaled $995.951.82, which includes $23,811.38 worth of interest on the $972,140.44 amount of donations.

According to the Community Foundation of the Ozarks (CFO), the Tornado First Response Fund received 991 gifts, ranging from $1 to $119,000 that came from around the world.

Donations to the Fund have since slowed, but grant allocations continue to provide assistance.

The Fund’s Board of Trustees offered three grant cycles, and awarded grants to charitable organizations & governmental entities for the use of funds to provide the following:

  • Relief to tornado survivors
  • Rebuilding and restoring infrastructure
  • Enhancing disaster preparedness through improved warning and safety measures

Stinnett says he was pleased with the timing of the fund allocations in using the three grant cycles.

“Although some may have thought this was dragged out a little long, we intentionally did it in this manner,” he says. “Disaster management officials had indicated that after the first wave of support coming into our community, some of those resources would leave, and we would still have needs that aren’t being met. As this occurred, the recovery efforts continued because this fund was a resource, allowing the agencies to address the unmet needs of the community.”

Anyone interested in more information or donating to the recovery efforts of Joplin and Duquesne can visit the CFO website or the recovery fund website.

See the full report here.


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