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Missouri Legislature's Veto Session Nears

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- In less than one month, lawmakers will return to Jefferson City for their veto session, where they will attempt to override some of governor's decisions.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- In less than one month, lawmakers will return to Jefferson City for their veto session, where they will attempt to override some of governor's decisions.

Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed more than thirty bills this session. A series of tax breaks are the most contests. Nixon calls them "Friday Favors" that would drain $776 million dollars from state and local budgets, but some lawmakers say they will benefit the economy by stimulating business.

Nixon withheld about $100 million from schools because of the estimated revenue loss.

"If he cannot make the effective argument about not overriding the veto about using education as the backdrop. He's not ever going to be able to make a case," political analyst and MSU professor Dr. Brian Calfano said.  "There's obvious back and forth on those projects and how accurate they are ... but the idea with the withholding is that the state cannot by constitution mandate spend more than it is taking in."

In the August 5 primary, special elections for vacant seats added two more Republicans to the House -- giving them more than the two-thirds majority required for vetoes. Republicans already have that in the Senate.

"Next month, the House will reconvene for veto session, and we will put this supermajority to good use for the people of our great state," House Speaker Tim Jones said in a statement.

Legislators have already overriden Nixon's veto of a $620 million tax cut, but with big issues in the balance, Calfano says nothing is guaranteed.

"(It) wouldn't be the first time in recent history that there was a mid counting of votes on an override," Calfano said.

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