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Local Companies, Prospective Employee Must Brush Up After Supreme Court Contraceptive Ruling

SPRINGFIELD -- Employers and employees now have some decisions to make about what health care they will offer and what jobs they will take.
SPRINGFIELD -- Employers and employees now have some decisions to make about what health care they will offer and what jobs they will take.

Lynne Haggerman, a Human Resources Consultant and Lynne Haggerman and Associates says employers will have to educate themselves on this ruling. 

In the meantime prospective employees will have to determine what is important to them.
 
While the owners of Hobby Lobby thank God, their employees and supporters in a taped statement on YouTube, owners of "closely held" corporations around the nation are preparing to do their homework.

"But, as a human resource consultant you do have to know the law. So yes, employers will come to me with questions about, they'll need guidance and advice on what the new laws mean, how to run their businesses accordingly. What's the right and wrong thing to do, how does this impact them?" Haggerman said. 

On the other hand, Haggerman says prospective employees have much to weigh when taking a job. 

"Will I like the job duties, will I be able to do the job duties, what are the benefits, what's vacation, what's the copay, what are the deductibles, what's the maximum out of pocket." said Haggerman
 
Haggerman is unsure if this will be a centerpiece issue. 

"I've been in business many years and I find it very had to imagine that an individual would build their entire job search around this one issue," Haggerman said.

Haggerman says some new employer benefits might outweigh them not backing certain types of contraception. 

"What's the copay, what are the deductibles, what's the maximum out of pocket, so if a company does not cover contraception possibly the business they are going to has lower deductibles, lower out of pockets so the employee could pay for that cost themselves and actually come out ahead and have more money in their pocket," said Haggerman

But what if an employee wants to know about a prospective employer? Prepare to do you homework. 

Haggerman explained "First thing to do would be to go on the website and see if they would be considered a person regarding their religious beliefs. If it's not obvious, that clear like Hobby Lobby, your second choice could be to ask around your community because, most businesses who rely on God this much for their business are very vocal, so usually you can ask friends and family and you'll discover this. Another option would be to ask the question in the interview. Another option would be, whenever you're interviewing to ask for a copy of their health plan."

In the petition to the court the companies that brought this case said they do no object to all kinds of birth control including specific birth control pills, sterilization surgery like vasectomies, diaphragms, condoms and sponges. 

You can read the court's opinion along with the dissenting opinion in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby by clicking this link. 
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