46°F
Sponsored by

Legal Battle Over Power Lines in Recess

EUREKA SPRINGS, Ark. -- The evidentiary hearings on the Southwest Power Corporation’s (SWEPCO’s) proposed power line project in northwest Arkansas are on hold until Oct. 1, when a judge will hear further evidence from both the company and oppositional groups.
EUREKA SPRINGS, Ark. – The evidentiary hearings on the Southwest Power Corporation’s (SWEPCO’s) proposed power line project in northwest Arkansas are on hold until Oct. 1, when a judge will hear further evidence from both the company and oppositional groups.

In Eureka Springs Pat Costner and the other members of Save the Ozarks, the primary opposition for SWEPCO, feel confident in the way things are going so far.

“If facts, truth and law count, we've won it hands down,” she said. “No Question.”

Costner’s 135-acre property is one of the plots of land the SWEPCO lines could bisect. The company has already dropped three of the proposed routes for the line, including one that would have passed near the Thorn Crown Chapel.

“I moved here with the intent only of preserving it,” she said. “And that’s been my intent all these years.”

Costner and Save the Ozarks contest that the power line project will disrupt the scenic landscape of Carroll and Berry Counties, and create environmental hazards in the area.

“It meets no public need,” she said. “It’s purpose is to make money.”

But SWEPCO’s arguments suggest that the power supply to Arkansas and parts of Missouri will become outdated in future years if no action is taken.

Peter Main, a spokesperson for the company, said regulators will have to balance a need for better technology with the concerns of the residents along the routes.

“The biggest misconception, I think, is that the project is not needed,” he said. “If the facilities that are needed are not in place, we're not able to serve our customers.”

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus