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Improving Your Finances in 2014

Many people make a New Year's resolution to handle their money better, but don't know where to start.
Many people make a New Year's resolution to handle their money better, but don't know where to start.

"It's a new year, start over again, but do it with a budget this year," said Marshall Hogue, Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

January 1st is fresh with potential to get your finances in check.

"Pitfalls in this society when it comes to money is just spending it without really knowing what you're doing. I think you have to have a plan," said Hogue. 

If you don't know where to start, financial advisors say necessities come first.

"After that, it's what you prioritize to be most important for you or your family," said Hogue.

Always expect the unexpected just in case.

"If you've got money for a tire going bad, or your car breaking down, it doesn't become an emergency. It just becomes an expenditure you've already planned for," said Hogue.

Experts say saving money for a rainy day can also mean saving you from piling up debt.

"If you don't have an emergency plan, your credit card is your emergency plan, and that's no plan," said Hogue.

Lastly, financial advisors warn you about making impulsive purchases.

"There's nothing wrong with being spontaneous, as long as you've saved the money to be spontaneous with," said Hogue.



(story by KODE, Joplin, MO)

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