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Hometown Hero Works to Show Gratitude to Veterans

Springfield, Mo. -- 2.7 million American men and women served in the Vietnam War. Today, there are fewer than 900,000 still alive. One local man is working on a creating the ultimate thank you for those ultimate sacrifices. A 5-by-8 foot granite thank you card for Vietnam veterans is in the works to be presented at the memorial wall in D.C. on Memorial Day 2015.
Springfield, Mo. -- 2.7 million American men and women served in the Vietnam War. Today, there are fewer than 900,000 still alive.

“It’s time for America to say thank you,” says Dr. William Scott Magill, a veteran of the Marine and U.S. Army Medical Corp. “Thank you for what you did, that you for answering your countries call and thank you to bringing honor to our glorious military while they are still alive.”

The retired obstetrician is dedicating his time to an organization called VIDOL or "Veterans in Defense of Liberty."

“Which is finally aimed at America doing the right thing and healing this national wound and paying this overdue debt of gratitude,” says Magill.

Magill is working on a creating the ultimate thank you for those ultimate sacrifices.  A 5-by-8 foot granite thank you card for Vietnam veterans is in the works to be presented at the memorial wall in D.C. on Memorial Day 2015.

Magill hopes to collect 5 to 15 million signatures from Americans who want to let the veterans know they are appreciated.  Those names will be transposed on the granite card and held in history.

Already thousands of signatures and donations have been collected.

“These cards will ultimately be stored in Vietnam-era duffle bags and transported to D.C. and escorted by rolling thunder in 2015,” says Magill. “The names will be transposed on to the large card. The duffle bags will be stored along the walkway of the Vietnam wall and then will be archived by the parks department and it’s where everybody's name will be stored.”

As for veterans, they've already been touched by the heartfelt campaign.

“We all know some real crusty Vietnam veterans that I really thought the response could be ‘the heck with them, they didn't care about me when I came home, I don’t care about it now,’” says Magill. “And the ones that I thought would be most likely to respond that way are the ones that have the biggest tear rolling down their cheek.”

For more information on the thank you card campaign, check out the links above.

 
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