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Family Dives into Cold Water for Close Friend

LEBANON, Mo. -- There's a new way people are giving back and it's costing them a dive into cold water. It's called "The 24 Hour Cold Water Challenge." It's where someone challenges another person to jump into a cold body of water. Those who accept the challenge pay ten dollars to the charity of their choice or they can forfeit and pay $100 to the challenger's choice.
LEBANON, Mo. --  There's a new way people are giving back and it's costing them a dive into cold water.

It's called "The 24 Hour Cold Water Challenge."  It's where someone challenges another person to jump into a cold body of water.  Those who accept the challenge pay $10 to the charity of their choice or they can forfeit and pay $100 to the challenger's choice.

Call it going cold for a cause.

"It was very cold," says Devin Lewis.  "Just wanted to get it over with fast."

"I think I lost all sensation," says Sondra Kincheloe.  "The minute I touched the water, I started freezing and had to force myself to keep going."

People are jumping into freezing cold water all to benefit a charity of their choice.

"I have no idea who started it, but it's been all over my news feed," says Tracy Stowe.  "People from Lebanon-- we even have friends in Arkansas doing it, so it's all over the place."

When this family was asked to accept the 24 hour cold water challenge, they jumped right in-- feet first, of course.

People are taking on the challenge for many different reasons-- but the family we spoke to jumped in for their close friend.

53-year-old Dave Hutton is recovering from a massive stroke.

"Dave Hutton is a wonderful friend," says Kincheloe.  "And I'd do anything for him and his wife."

"I truly have lost count of how many people have jumped into cold water on his behalf," says Dave Hutton's Wife, Kathy Hutton.  "It's been a blessing and it humbles us and when I show him and tell him, he cries because he's so touched."

While $10 alone may not seem like it could do much, with everyone coming together for Dave, it's going a long way.

"It adds up," says Hutton.  "To a house payment or a car payment for me-- anything to help pay his medical bills, stuff like that."

A bonding experience for one family to help heal another.

"I'll do anything I can to help anyone," says Kincheloe.  "If you haven't done this yet, I challenge you to do it."

Dave Hutton's stroke caused him to lose three-quarters of his left brain, affecting his right side.  He lost use of his right arm, right leg and some vision in his right eye.  He's slowly regaining his speech.

Hutton is a News DJ for KTTK in Lebanon.  His family says they hope to get him back home by this summer.

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