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Bill Clinton Adds Voice to Criticism of Affordable Care Act

President Obama calls former President Bill Clinton the "Secretary of Explaining Stuff" because of his plain spoken ways. That's why the former president's criticism of a part of the Affordable Care Act is getting a lot of attention.
President Obama calls former President Bill Clinton the "Secretary of Explaining Stuff" because of his plain spoken ways.

That's why the former president's criticism of a part of the Affordable Care Act is getting a lot of attention.

"I personally believe, even if it takes a change to the law, the president should honor the commitment the federal government made to those people and let them keep what they got," Clinton said in an interview this week.  He is among the latest to criticize President Obama for failing to keep his promise.

"If you like your insurance plan you will keep it," President Obama has famously said in several public comments.

That could help explain the latest Quinnipiac poll which shows just 44 percent of Americans view the president as honest and trustworthy.

The White House says President Obama has ordered his staff to find a solution for the nearly 5 million Americans who will lose their insurance beginning January 1.

"That's not so easy to imagine how that happens," says Gail Wilensky, senior fellow at Project HOPE.  Wilensky is health care expert and served as an adviser during the first Bush administration.  

She says there's likely not enough time to reverse course.  "How do you re-contact people?  How exactly do you reinstitute something that was scheduled to go out of business January 1st."

But Republicans are pressing ahead with a plan to allow people to keep their existing policies, which the White House opposes.

"That would cause more problems and create more problems, and do more harm than any good it would do," says Jay Carney, White House press secretary.

The House is expected to vote on the bill Friday.

Today on Capitol Hill,  the House oversight committee plans to question officials about security and technical issues with the troubled healthcare.gov website.


(Susan McGinnis, CBS News)



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