80°F
Sponsored by

Convoy of Hope Helps with Typhoon Haiyan Aftermath

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Haiyan was one of the most intense land-falling storms ever recorded on the planet. The devastation in the Philippines is so great that it's impacting people over 8,000 miles away here in Springfield.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Haiyan was one of the most intense land-falling storms ever recorded on the planet. The devastation in the Philippines is so great that it's impacting people over 8,000 miles away here in Springfield.

Springfield residents with Convoy of Hope are arriving in the Philippines Nov. 11. 

They are bracing themselves for the horrific sights they are about to witness. 

"I think this storm is going to be one of the worst we've ever seen undoubtedly,” says Jeff Nene, National Spokesperson for Convoy of Hope. “Just from the reports that have come in so far, and we still haven't heard the extent of it."
 
Nene is preparing to head to the Philippines next week. 


"When you try to express it and explain it to someone who has never experienced it, it's difficult,” says Nene. “There's really nothing like it other than a war zone.  People are going in and you're seeing people whose lives have been changed forever.”

Jeff Nene is part of a disaster response team organizing Convoy of Hope's mass food distribution in the Philippines.  It has already committed over one million meals for the typhoon survivors. 


"In order to rebuild their lives people first have to be able to sustain their lives,” says Nene. “So food is an incredibly important ingredient in that.”

Convoy of Hope has a long-standing relationship with the Philippines. It currently feeds about 20,000 Filipino children. 


"So we've got a good supply of food in country already from that,” says Nene. “What we'll do is we'll start pulling from that supply, start distributing it in the disaster areas, and then backfill with what we're sending from Springfield right now.”
  
The task at hand in the Philippines is now much more difficult due to Haiyan. 


The Red Cross reports the typhoon affected 4.3 million people.  More than 10,000 were killed and more than 330,000 are homeless. 

"The beautiful thing about the Ozarks to me, and I've lived here for 18 years now, I'm still amazed at how they respond in times of disaster or in times of need,” says Nene. “This community is always so willing to help others in need.  It's always exciting to see that, and it's always refreshing to see that because you don't see it everywhere.”


For information on how you can help these people in the Philippines, click here.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus