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City Council Pushes Back Pseudoephedrine Prescription Vote Again

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – The City Council was considering making pseudoephedrine available through prescription only, but you will not need a prescription to get certain cold and allergy medications in Springfield for now.

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – The City Council was considering making pseudoephedrine available through prescription only, but you will not need a prescription to get certain cold and allergy medications in Springfield for now.

Tonight was to be the final vote on the bill, but the council pushed to delay any voting on the issue until next summer in a 5-4 vote.

As the mayor said in the meeting Monday night, the issue is now postponed indefinitely.

“I am still having trouble, “ says Council member Craig Fishel, who made the motion to delay the already delayed pseudoephedrine prescription bill.

The council was considering making pseudoephedrine prescription only because drug makers can use it to make meth.

“I am having a hard time supporting the bill as it is written since we don’t provide all our other alternatives,” says Council member Jerry Compton.

Those who voted to postpone say they want time for the state to come up with Missouri law to address the meth and pseudoephedrine issue.

Fishel also says the majority of Springfield didn’t want the prescription rule.

"We've been dealing with this for three years now and it's time to make a decision,” says Council member Jeff Seifried. “We put it off and put it off and we looked towards the state to find a solution the last three years and they have been unable to do so."

Council member Cindy Rushefsky was opposed to postponing the vote.

“I am opposed to postponing it until June,” says Rushefsky. “I think we need to do what we need to do."

Springfield's police chief and other supporters are looking to curb local meth-making. Supporters cite safety and health reasons for wanting the prescription rule.

Opponents such as Dave Myers with Live Free Springfield say polling shows people don’t want the rule.

"From a regular box behind the counter to a copay of $30 for a doctor's visit all the way up to $100,” says Myers. “Just to get a prescription for a common cold allergy medicine."



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