66°F
Sponsored by

Christmas Trees Thrive This Year Thanks to Plentiful Rains

WEBB CITY, MO.--- A rainy spring and summer could mean a merry Christmas for families around the Four States. Last year's drought took a toll on everything from corn to Christmas trees, but things are looking a lot better this year.
They've put on real good growth this spring with all the rain we had, and the rain just never let up this summer
WEBB CITY, MO.--- A rainy spring and summer could mean a merry Christmas for families around the Ozarks. Last year's drought took a toll on everything from corn to Christmas trees, but things are looking a lot better this year.

Southwest Missouri Christmas tree farmers say there will be plenty of healthy Christmas trees to go around this year. Andy Johnson owns Bridgestone Christmas Tree Farm near Webb City.  This is the second year they'll be selling trees. After losing a few trees last year, he expects this year's sales to be much better.

"We're probably gonna be busy right off the bat, so it'll be nice," says Johnson.

Andy Johnson invested thousands of dollars towards a family tree farm in 2006. Last year, about 500 of his smallest and newest trees didn't make it through the drought, and many of the surviving trees weren't in the best shape.

"Last couple years with the drought, the trees were under a lot of stress. We didn't prune them back as much as we would've liked to because they were already stressed out. We didn't want to stress them out," said Johnson.

This year's bunch of trees tells a different story.

"This year, the trees actually look really well. They've put on real good growth this spring with all the rain we had, and the rain just never let up this summer," said Johnson.

The rain was a gift that kept on giving.

"It was borderline too much rain, believe it or not, and after the last couple years, the drought, it was a welcome sight," said Johnson.

Now, visitors can pick from rows and rows of healthy trees.

"This year, we were able to get a better handle on the shaping of them, so a lot better shaped tree than they have been in the past," said Johnson.

Most of the local tree farms open up the weekend after Thanksgiving.




(story contributed by KODE/KSN, Joplin, MO)


Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus