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Billy Long Speaks to Shutdown and Possible Solution

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- A new CNN poll shows that only ten percent of Americans approve of the job congress is doing in Washington, an all-time low.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- A new CNN poll shows that only ten percent of Americans approve of the job congress is doing in Washington, an all-time low.

KOLR-10 spoke with Missouri District Seven Representative Republican Billy Long to find out what he thinks might end this costly game of chicken.

Long said he stands by the opinion of his constituents when it comes to the Affordable Care Act.

"It's a train wreck, forcing people to buy insurance they don't like it," Long said.

He said many Missourians have reached out, asking him to fight against the Obamacare health insurance mandate.

"Our calls have about doubled and our emails have about doubled from a normal time," he said.

But the disagreement over health insurance has led to a partial government shutdown.

A fight Long said has been brewing for three years.

"We need some adult leadership in Washington and right now we're getting a lot of name calling from both sides and I don't think it's productive," he said.

Democrats like Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill said the bickering is having a far reaching negative affect on this country.

"They are going to throw a tantrum and throw the American people and our economic recovery under the bus. This is really going to hurt real people," she said in a Fox News interview.

Long said republicans are not interested in a short term budget fix.

"We need to do a long term budget. I don't know if there would be the votes right now, I kind of think there would not be, but it doesn't matter. We're not going to put a clean bill on the floor right now," Long said.

Members of both parties said that talking through this issue could lead to a resolution.

"I'm going around talking to people individually sitting down with democrat leadership, republican leadership, trying to get this dialogue started," Long said.

But each day that passes without that dialogue means Americans are still out of work.

And Long believes it may last at least another week.

"There's going to be a big push to get this over with before that next pay period. Most people get paid twice a month and around October 14 you might see some movement," he said.

Long has elected to not take a paycheck during the shutdown. Representatives Vicki Hartzler and Jason Smith have stopped their paychecks as well.

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