63°F
Sponsored by

Bedtimes and Childhood Behavior

Doctors are finding that having a set bed time can make a difference, especially when little ones get older.
Chances are, if you have kids, you've had trouble getting them to bed. 

They may want to be like grownups and stay up late.

But now doctors are finding that having a set bed time can make a difference, especially when little ones get older. 

It may not be the easiest thing to get your child to do, but scientists are finding that putting your little one to bed at a set time can help their attitude both at home and at school.

"Sleep is important for everybody, but especially for little ones because it's so important for growth, in addition to learning, concentrating in school, and actually for good behavior during the day," explains Dr. pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu.

A recent study in the journal of "pediatrics" found that children who went to bed at irregular times were more likely to have behavioral problems by the time they reached elementary school.

Researchers looked at data from more than 10-thousand children and their sleeping behaviors at ages, 3, 5 and 7.  They also looked at comments made by their mothers and teachers on the child's behavior. They found that, as they aged, children who went to bed at a certain hour, had fewer problems in school, than those who had no set bedtime. And when parents switched their children to a more strict nighttime routine, the child's behavior improved.


(Holly Firfer for CNN's Health Minute)


Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus