66°F
Sponsored by

"Anchorman" Exhibit Opens at D.C.'s Newseum

WASHINGTON, DC -- The Newseum in Washington, D.C., has a new exhibit on fictional, but legendary news anchors Ron Burgundy and Veronica Corningstone from the movie "Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy." But the exhibit also takes on a serious issue.
WASHINGTON, DC -- The Newseum in Washington, D.C., is known for tackling hard-hitting subjects like civil rights and war reporting, but a new exhibit centers on fictional, but legendary news anchors Ron Burgundy and Veronica Corningstone from the movie "Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy."  But the exhibit also takes on a serious issue. 

The nation's most pompous local news anchor sauntered into theaters nearly 10 years ago…leaving behind a host of memorable lines like:
"You Stay classy, San Diego!"
"I'm kind of a big deal."
"I love Scotch. I love Scotchy, scotch, scotch."
 
Now Will Farrell's favorite character has found a place in the nation's premier journalism museum - the Newseum in Washington, DC.

"I think pop culture, and this movie is a pop culture phenomenon, is a really legitimate part of the mix of storytelling that we do here," says exhibit curator Cathy Trost.
 
Trost takes us through the items in the exhibit.  "This is the famous Jazz Flute, Ron's Jazz flute."
 
Reporter-in-the-field Brian Fontana's special cologne is also on display.  So is the whip used in one of the movie's most famous scenes - the ratings war street rumble.
"San Diego's rival news teams have a rumble in the parking lot, face off, and there's great damage that occurs," Trost recounts.
Reporter: "And, of course, Luke Wilson loses an arm."
 
And there's also Veronica Corningstone's 70s power suits.
 
But behind the humor, the exhibit addresses a serious issue - women breaking news barriers.
 
"It really was a time when women were fighting for equality on the news desk," Trost notes.
 
That fight was reflected in once scene from the movie when Ron and Veronica were just trying to sign off the newscast, each trying to get in the last word.  "Thanks for stopping by."  "Stay classy, San Diego."  "Thanks for stopping by."  "Stay classy.  I'm Ron Burgundy."


(Nancy Cordes, CBS News)

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus