61°F
Sponsored by

Alligator Found Inside Chicago Airport Terminal

CHICAGO -- Millions of visitors pass through Chicago's O'Hare Airport every year, but one in particular is capturing a lot of attention.
CHICAGO -- Millions of visitors pass through Chicago's O'Hare Airport every year, but one in particular is capturing a lot of attention.

That visitor?  An alligator. The animal was discovered at the airport Friday.


"I was out there and a passenger pointed out that there was an alligator up under here."

"And what did you say when she said there's an alligator?"

"I looked I said, 'What?!'"

But sure enough, there was, as seen on this video shot by a co-worker.

"He was right in the corner, right there. Because he had kind of got stuck under there."

Tineka Walker, who works for Universal Security, radioed airport police for help.

"When you made the call what did you say?"

"I said 'OCC, there's an alligator in terminal 3.'"

She wasn't the only one laughing.

"What did you think when you heard the call."

"Figured somebody was messing with us," admits Ofc. Anthony Oliver with Chicago Police.

"It said alligator loose by lower Terminal 3 by the escalators."

"And did you think, 'Did I hear that right?'"

"Absolutely."

Department of aviation workers caught the alligator using a broom and dustpan and chicago police held it for animal control.

"Is this a first for you? Finding an alligator in an airport?"

"This is the first one at O'Hare Airport, yes," says Ofc. Tim Bolger of Chicago Police.

An official with the Chicago Herpetological Society says it's very fortunate someone wasn't hurt.

"What if a little kid grabbed this, thinking it was a toy? That could do a nasty job," he said.
"
As for how the alligator got to O'Hare, that's still under investigation, but it's possible his owner brought him by train.

These are just a couple of pictures of an alligator on the CTA Blue Line tweeted Friday.

A comparison appears to be a match.

"The patterns on an alligator are as unique as your fingerprint. We can actually match this band right here with that band," the reptile expert says.

"They probably realized they couldn't take it through check point, and just let him go, but oh my God," Walker said.

The alligator will  be treated for about six months because authorities say it appears the owner didn't feed it properly and stunted its growth.


(Mai Martinez for CNN)


Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus